Do you live in the Raleigh/Durham area? Are you a fan of the Open Source movement? You’re in luck! Check out RTP 180: Open Source All The Things on September 17th (for free!). The event features guest speakers from three schools you might have heard (NC State, Duke, and UNC), as well as local members of the Open Source community. In addition to basing our operation on the tenants of Open Source, we here at Maniacal Labs enjoy supporting local people and organizations who champion the cause.

The event is free, they just ask that you RSVP (“buy” a free ticket). See the Eventbrite page for more details. We’ll be there, and we look forward to seeing you there as well!

I had occasion to be out and about last night at one of Durham, NC’s fine local breweries, Fullsteam. While there, I was impressed by 3 things. First, how oppressively hot it was for late evening. This led to the next thing that impressed me, the big-ass fan they had set up to try and cool the place. I’m serious, it was a Big Ass Fan. It was huge (8′ diameter). Cranked to the max, I’m sure it could have easily blown down all three of the Little Pig’s houses. But these things were ancillary to the thing that most impressed me while there: The Bullitron.

The Bullitron is a Winitron arcade cabinet constructed by members of the local Durham hackerspace Splat Space. The Winitron arcade network is made up of what amount to MAME cabinets running a custom launcher that connects players to a network of free Indie arcade games. The founders of the Winitron network have mandated that in order to receive access to the software and the network, you are required to build your own cabinet and set it up in a place where as many people as possible can play (for free, of course). Obviously, next to a handful of pinball machines at a bar would be a perfect place for such a device. After a few minutes of playing Nidhogg, a two-player “fencing” game, and another Galaga-esque title, I was hooked on the idea.

There are a number of things that are really cool about this, but two in particular capture the experience pretty well. First, MAME cabinets are cool. I want one. I will build one at some point. Arcade machines are a huge nostalgia trip for me. I used to love going to arcades when I was a kid, and being able to build your own multi-function arcade machine is, to me, a pretty neat concept. The DIY nature of this is the second bit of awesome. And the Winitron concept is very much in keeping with the Maker spirit of “make cool stuff and share it.” The mechanics are pretty simple, just a few buttons and a joystick interfaced to a PC running some custom software. But throw it together in a stylish package and with very little effort, you can be whuppin’ on your friends in any one of a number of classic and modern arcade icons.

There’s a popular saying among the three of us: “When Maniacal Labs has an office…” Part optimism, part wishful thinking, and often met with a chuckle (for now at least). We’ll see. Who knows what’s in the cards for our little operation. But when Maniacal Labs has an office, there will be some manner of arcade machine therein.

-dan

*Maniacal Labs is not associated with, nor shills for, any of the above-mentioned entities. But hackerspaces are cool, so ‘what up’ to Splat Space!

http://www.heathkit.com/heathkit-faq.html

If you have ever soldered together a bit of electronic whatsits that you purchased in kit form, and if you have an appreciation for making and/or repairing your own electronic stuff, then this news should grab your attention.

A quick lesson: Heathkit was a line of electronics kits sold by the Heath Company starting after World War 2. The kits ranged from the name-making oscilloscope kit to amateur radio kits to famous Heathkit H8 digital computer. Talk to anyone that was (or whose parents were) interested in electronics kits “back in the day” and Heathkit will almost certainly come up.

I admit that Heathkit was a bit before my time, but when you hear people talk about it, there is a air of reverence and respect. I have a great appreciation for these early Makers, and for the history (that they lived through) that has led me to my chosen profession. For me personally, being able to build a Heathkit would be, to use a technical term, friggin’ awesome.

The three of us, with our ridiculous concoctions, pay tribute to the ideals that Heathkit instilled in generations past, and (hopefully) will do once again for this and future generations.

-dan